Since the adoption of the Official Community Plan in 2014, we have undertaken two neighbourhood-focused planning processes: the Coronation Park Neighbourhood Plan and the Moody Centre Station Transit-Oriented Development Plan. Both processes included opportunities for the public to provide input.

Coronation Park Neighbourhood Plan

In 2017, Council amended Port Moody’s Official Community Plan to include the Coronation Park Neighbourhood Plan (Section 15.3.1), which outlines a new vision for this neighbourhood: a transit-oriented, pedestrian-friendly, and bike-friendly community that has a range of housing forms and types in close proximity to shops, amenities, and public transit. The Plan includes opportunities for a variety of land uses, including high-rise residential, high-rise mixed use, low-rise residential, and park space.

The Coronation Park Neighbourhood Plan was completed after extensive consultation with members of the community. Here are key dates from the public consultation process:

  • June 18, 2015 – Community Dialogue Session to obtain input from Coronation Park residents
  • July 7, 2015 – Land Use Committee Visioning Session
  • May 18, 2016 – Open House #1: presentation of low, medium, medium-high, and high density scenarios
  • September 15, 2016 – Open House #2: presentation of recommended land use concept (medium-high density with high-rise residential, high-rise mixed use, low-rise residential, and park space)
  • April 11, 2017 – Council gives 1st and 2nd reading to a draft Official Community Plan (OCP) amendment incorporating the Coronation Park Neighbourhood Plan; Council directs staff to schedule a Public Hearing
  • April 25, 2017 – Public Hearing is held on the draft OCP amendment
  • May 9, 2017 – Council amends the OCP to include the Coronation Park Neighbourhood Plan

Additional Information

On March 27, 2018, Council approved funding for a transportation analysis of the OCP amendment for this neighbourhood. Working with the City of Coquitlam, the City of Port Moody completed the Coronation Park Transportation Study which includes a recommended road network with new neighbourhood access points.

On May 28, 2019, Council approved the Coronation Park Transportation Study and a corporate policy on Coronation Park development application requirements to help guide future development of this neighbourhood.

  • Read an overview of the Coronation Park Transportation Study, as well as the corporate policy, in the agenda package (Item 9.3) for the June 25, 2019 Regular Council Meeting. 
  • View the Coronation Park Transportation Study presentation to Council.
  • Watch the video from the Coronation Park Transportation Study presentation to Council on June 25, 2019.
    Please see Item 9.3.

Frequently Asked Questions

Since the completion of the Coronation Park Neighbourhood Plan in 2017, we have received questions from property owners with respect to the potential redevelopment of this neighbourhood. Please read below for answers to some of the most commonly asked questions.

Have there been any changes to the Official Community Plan since the Coronation Park Neighbourhood Plan was completed? 
In 2017, after significant consultation with members of the community, Council amended Port Moody’s Official Community Plan (OCP) to include the Coronation Park Neighbourhood Plan (Section 15.3.1), which outlines a new vision for this neighbourhood. Since then, the City has not made any changes to this section of the OCP, or any other sections that refer to the Coronation Park Neighbourhood Plan.  
Why did the City work on a transportation study in cooperation with the City of Coquitlam?  

In Section 15.3.1 of the Official Community Plan, Coronation Park Policy #7 indicates that the redevelopment of Coronation Park shall include: 

“Vehicle infrastructure, including a new road connection/access to Barnet Highway. Rezoning of any properties within the Coronation Park Neighbourhood will not be considered by the City until an agreement has been reached on a new transportation access. This may include a feasibility study on access options.” 

With any future redevelopment of Coronation Park, a new road connection/access to Barnet Highway would be required to accommodate the significant number of new residents to the area. While this requirement is the responsibility of a future developer, Council authorized staff to work with the City of Coquitlam, given our shared municipal boundary in this neighbourhood, on a transportation study to inform Council’s consideration of any future development proposals.

At a Closed Meeting of Council on May 28, 2019, Council endorsed the Coronation Park Neighbourhood Transportation Study. You can read an overview of the transportation study in City staff’s May 14, 2019 Report to Council (agenda item 9.3). Any future road costs will be the responsibility of the private sector developer.  

Why are you proposing changes to the current road network within the Coronation Park neighbourhood
The transition from a neighbourhood of townhouses and single-family homes to one with a mix of high-rise residential, high-rise mixed use, and low-rise residential buildings will require changes to the existing road structure, such as wider lanes and pathways. The location of the new roads also promotes larger land parcels that could accommodate medium-to-high-density development.
Why did you select a location in Coquitlam as the new point for access to Barnet Highway?
We reviewed several locations that could provide access to Barnet Highway. The proposed long-term connection in Coquitlam, between Palmer Avenue and Barnet Highway, was selected based on grades and potential impact on the surrounding arterial road network. When compared with locations further west, this location would have flatter grades to make it safer during winter conditions and a lesser impact on traffic flow through the Ioco Road intersection.
Why is there an interim access point proposed by Edinburgh Place, just east of the gas station access?
An interim access point, with only right-turn movements permitted when entering or exiting the neighbourhood, is proposed to support access to the neighbourhood for residents and construction vehicles during development of the area. It would not be feasible to use the proposed location, by Edinburgh Place, as a long-term connection to Barnet Highway. This location is too close to the Ioco Road intersection, with no space for left-turn movements when entering the neighbourhood from Barnet Highway. This interim access point would be removed when the permanent access point is constructed in Coquitlam.
If an owner doesn’t wish to sell their property, could this result in an orphaned lot surrounded by new development?
The City will require parcel assemblies – sites formed by joining a number of properties together – as a condition of development in the Coronation Park neighbourhood. This means the City will not accept any development applications that would create orphaned lots.
How many people are expected to live in this neighbourhood in the future, and how will the City address the increase in traffic?
The Coronation Park Neighbourhood Plan envisions opportunities for high-rise residential, high-rise mixed use, low-rise residential, and park uses. The potential number of residential units within this neighbourhood is 2,225, with an estimated population of 4,449 at the end of the development phase (which is expected to take about 20 years).

 

Traffic impact studies, which will be required during the development application process for each land parcel assembly, will help to address challenges related to traffic. And this neighbourhood’s close proximity to high-quality public transit will make it easy for people to choose sustainable methods of transportation.

Has the City received any development applications for property in the Coronation Park neighbourhood?
No, we have not received any development applications for property in the Coronation Park neighbourhood. 
Can a person submit a development application even if there are planning activities underway?
Development applications may be submitted to the City at any time, regardless of any planning work that is in progress. 
Is there planning work in progress?

We are currently working on a financing strategy, i.e. a plan to cover the cost of new infrastructure and amenities (such as park space, a pedestrian overpass, and a new road connection/access to Barnet Highway) that would be needed if the area is redeveloped in the future. Possible financing tools include:

  • development cost charges (fees collected from developers to cover the cost of growth-related infrastructure and amenities);
  • community amenity contributions (voluntary contributions from developers to cover the cost of infrastructure and amenities that are not directly related to population growth); and
  • density bonus (an agreement between the City and a developer that allows for additional density, i.e. extra floor space, in exchange for community amenities, such as park space, affordable housing, libraries, etc.)  

 

Moody Centre Station Transit-Oriented Development Plan

In 2017, Council amended Port Moody’s Official Community Plan to include the Moody Centre Station Neighbourhood Plan (Section 15.5.6), which outlines a new vision for this transit-oriented neighbourhood including: higher density, mixed use, pedestrian-friendly development with a range of housing options around the Moody Centre SkyTrain Station. The Plan includes the creation of an urban greenway by daylighting Dallas/Slaughterhouse Creek, a pedestrian/bicyle overpass near the station across the tracks, a plaza around the station entrance and child-, family- and senior-friendly amenities. 

The Moody Centre Station Transit-Oriented Development Plan was completed after extensive consultation with members of the community. Here are key dates from the public consultation process:

  • October 6, 2016 – Open House #1: presentation of guiding principles and growth scenarios
  • December 2016 – Presentation of Survey #1 Results
  • March 1, 2017 – Open House #2: draft policy directions and proposed land use concept
  • April 2017: Presentation of Survey #2 Results
  • October 24, 2017 – Council gives first and second reading to a draft Official Community Plan (OCP) amendment incorporating the Moody Centre Station Transit-Oriented Development Plan; Council directs staff to schedule a Public Hearing
  • November 28, 2017 – Public Hearing is held on the draft OCP amendment and the amendment bylaw is adopted and incorporated in the City’s OCP.


On October 8, 2019, Council decided that an upcoming revision of the Official Community Plan will include a re-visioning for the Moody Centre neighbourhood with a primary focus on affordable residential units and revitalizing the neighbourhood as a regional employment centre (Moody Innovation Centre), with the addition of market housing.