The City of Port Moody has been a centre of industry production and business from its founding. Today, our city still embraces and values its local industry.

Local industry

Burrard Thermal Plant

Burrard Generating Station (BGS) located in the North West area of Port Moody was a 900-megawatt conventional natural gas-fired generating station. It was BC Hydro's only conventional steam-electrical thermal plant. During operations, Burrard Generating Station accounted for approximately 9% of BC Hydro's total capacity – enough power for about 700,000 homes.

Burrard Thermal Plant

In November 2013, the Province announced that BC Hydro will stop generating electricity at Burrard Generating Station (BGS) by 2016 due to the addition of two hydro-electric generating units at Mica Dam (north of Revelstoke), completion of the Interior to Lower Mainland (ILM) transmission line and installation of a new transformer at Meridian substation in Coquitlam.

Burrard Generating Station was constructed in the 1960s and 70s over which time six 150 MW generating units were put into service. The first unit was commissioned in 1962 and the last unit was completed in 1975.

Key facts:

  • established in the 1960s
  • 77 full time employees
  • 74 hectares plus 4 hectares leased from Port Metro Vancouver
  • 900 megawatt conventional natural gas-fired generating station
  • BC Hydro's only conventional steam-electrical thermal plant
  • powered by natural gas, a clean burning fuel, delivered by a pipeline owned by FortisBC.
  • Burrard Generating Station accounts for approximately 9% of BC Hydro's total capacity – enough power for about 700,000 homes
  • BGS provides back-up for the electrical system and transmission support
  • significant investments have been made to reduce air emissions, which have resulted in a 90% reduction in oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emissions
  • operates a Water permit from the Ministry of Environment which governs the seawater returned to Burrard Inlet as part of the cooling water system for the plant
  • operates Air Emissions permit from Metro Vancouver Regional District which governs NOx and other air emissions
  • BGS is the only natural gas-fired generating plant of its type in North America that has installed selective catalytic reduction technology to reduce NOx

Flavelle Sawmill Company

Flavelle Sawmill Company Ltd. is a private company categorized under forest product sawmill and lumber.

In 1905 Emerson Lumber was built by J.S. Emerson on leased waterfront property in Port Moody east of the Canadian Pacific Lumber Company's Port Moody mill. The mill office was located near Rocky Point Park in Port Moody and cut western red cedar lumber and shingles exclusively.

Flavelle Sawmill Company

On October 1st, 1912 the mill was purchased by Robert Thurston and Aird Flavelle and renamed the Thurston-Flavelle Mill. Flavelle Sawmill Company Ltd. was established and incorporated in 1931. In 1955 the mill was sold to Canadian Collieries Ltd. but was still called Flavelle Cedar. Weldwood of Canada Ltd. purchased the mill in 1964 and Flavelle Cedar became a division of Weldwood of Canada. In 1966 the production of shingles and shakes was discontinued. The mill changed hands again in 1995 when International Forest Products (Interfor) bought Weldwood of Canada Ltd. and Flavelle Cedar. The mill was modernized in 1995 with a major rebuild. In 1998 Flavelle Cedar closed but was reopened in 2000 when it was purchased by Mill and Timber. Currently (2009) the mill located at 2400 Murray Street has approximately 60 employees as is still known as Flavelle Cedar.

Key facts:

  • year established: 1931
  • 27 acres
  • 60 employees
  • materials incoming: raw logs
  • transport of incoming: ocean (boom) & truck
  • material outgoing: finished lumber
  • transport of outgoing: truck & railcar
  • hazardous materials onsite: risk of fire in wood products on site + risk of dusty-fueled explosion
  • primary fire response – Private hydrant system and fire hose stations + capacity for water-based fire attack and water supply

Imperial Oil

Imperial Oil is one of Canada's largest corporations and a leading member of the country's petroleum industry. The Imperial Oil plant located at 2225 Ioco Road is categorized as a gas distribution and production oil company.

At the turn of the 20th century, employment opportunities in Port Moody increased steadily thanks in part to oil refining. The British Columbia Refining Company Ltd was incorporated in 1908. One year later, the tanker Colonel E. L. Drake brought the first shipment of 25,000 barrels of crude oil from San Francisco to the refinery.

Imperial Oil

The Imperial Oil Company (Ioco) built in 1914 on the North shore of Burrard Inlet. However, crude oil wasn't processed there until 1915 as the first tanker load of oil was captured by Germans in the Pacific. By 1919, the refinery processed 2,000 barrels of crude a day. After being rebuilt in 1952-53, the facility was able to process 25,000 barrels of crude each day. Most of the 240 men who worked at the plant originally commuted from Port Moody by ferry or walking along the rail spur. Soon a shanty town of employee grew around the site and in 1921 the company began building an adjacent town-site. This town eventually contained 83 houses, two stores, a school, two churches, a community hall, a post office, a bowling green and clubhouse, tennis courts and a sports field. This site served the plant workers, their families and the sailors aboard the tankers docked there. The town had a lively social life with regular dances and social gatherings. The refinery was shut down in 1995 and in 2002 the town-site was established as a Heritage Conservation area.

Key facts:

  • year established: 1958
  • 50 acres
  • 16 employees
  • end-use bulk petroleum products: lubricants, asphalt, marine gas oil, intermediate and bunker fuels
  • marine bulk movement products: Marine gas oil, diesel flux, intermediate fuels and bunker fuels
  • the terminal loads barges with intermediate fuel oil in volume lots ranging 500 to 3,500 tonnes
  • terminal is typically supplied by rail car from Edmonton
  • marine gas oil and diesel flux are supplied by barge in full load quantities from Petro Canada's Burrard Terminal. The terminal is also supplied by imported bunker via barge

Pacific Coast Terminals

Pacific Coast Terminals is one of the most advanced bulk terminals around the globe. Connected to the primary rail system into Vancouver, their terminal receives sulphur and ethylene glycol from Western Canada and stores the raw product until it is ready to load directly into ships and exported around the globe.

Pacific Coast Terminals

Established in 1929, PCT's early years were in New Westminster, British Columbia, at the current site of the Westminster Quay Public Market. In 1960, PCT expanded to Port Moody and switched to handling sulphur and ethylene glycol. More than forty years later, the company has grown into one of the world's largest sulphur export terminals, and one of the largest bulk liquid terminals in the Port of Vancouver. During this time, Pacific Coast Terminals has also become an integral part of Port Moody. An ongoing supporter of arts, cultural and environmental initiatives in the community, PCT is also one of the largest industrial employers in the City.

Key facts:

  • established in 1929 in New Westminster; 1960 in Port Moody
  • 108 acres in size, primarily on filled-land
  • in 2013, PCT handled approximately 1.6 million tonnes of sulphur (capacity is 6M tonnes) and 695,000 tonnes of ethylene glycol (capacity is 1M tonnes)
  • from 2011 to 2013, PCT had a temporary permit to handle coal, transferring the product from train to vessel without any storage on site
  • PCT employs 70 FTEs in administration and labour positions
  • in 2012, PCT announced a proposed $220M expansion plan that would add potash and canola oil as products received, stored and shipped from the site
  • the proposed expansion plan included construction of a storage warehouse and a new dumper for potash, three new tanks for canola oil, and an upgraded secondary water treatment facility

Emergency Response Information:

  • Primary fire response (Pacific Coast Terminals maintains their own hydrant system, deluge systems and hose stations (PCT employees provide initial fire attack on small fires)
  • Water based fire attack and water supply (fireboat)
  • Emergency medical response (Pacific Coast Terminals will have industrial first aid attendants on site)
  • High Angle Rescue response
  • Confined Space Rescue response
  • Hazardous Materials Awareness response
  • Port Moody Fire Rescue and Pacific Coast Terminals participate in joint emergency response simulations

Reichold Industries Ltd.

The Reichhold Industries Limited – Port Moody facility manufactures four classes of resin product: alkyd/urethane coating resins, polyester resins, latex emulsion resins and alkyd emulsion resins. The plant located at 50 Douglas St. in Port Moody was opened in 1951. Reichhold Industries, Ltd. is an indirectly wholly-owned subsidiary of Reichhold Industries, Inc.

Reichold Industries Ltd.

All production operations are single line, batch processes. Production activities at the site include: Bulk raw material unloading and storage (tanker truck / rail car to storage tanks); Drum/package raw material unloading and storage; Batch chemical manufacturing; Thinning/blending; Filtration; Finished Goods Storage (Bulk and Drum); and, Finished goods loading (storage tanks to tanker truck / rail car).

In general, the alkyd/urethane, latex emulsion & alkyd emulsions coating resins go into commercial paints and coatings. Polyesters are unsaturated, and are used in the hard plastics industry, often to produce items such as counter tops and boat hulls.

Key facts:

  • year established: 1951
  • 9 acres
  • 26 employees
  • materials incoming: various solvents, vegetable oils, glycols and monomers
  • transport of incoming: Incoming materials are delivered to the site via tanker trucks, tanker cars and box trailers
  • material outgoing: Finished products (unsaturated polyester resins, coating resins, latex emulsions resins and alkyd emulsion resins)
  • hazardous materials onsite: The majority of hazardous onsite materials are flammable products
  • fire protection: The plant is equipped with a wet and dry fire protection system that is designed to protect from the various types of fire hazards the plant may face

SunCor Energy – Burrard Products Terminal

Suncor is one of Canada's largest integrated energy companies with a strong history in this country dating back to 1917. Today, in western Canada, across the east coast of Canada and internationally, Suncor explores, develops and produces conventional oil and natural gas.

The Suncor Energy – Burrard Products Terminal is a private company categorized under storage and distribution of petroleum products.

SunCor Energy - Burrard Products Terminal

The Suncor Energy Burrard Products Terminal receives and stores finished transportation fuel products as well as conducts light product finishing operations to make fuels ready for the marketplace. Although it is one facility, there are three distinct areas within the facility referred to as the upper, middle and lower plants. The terminal stores and distributes a number of finished fuel products including: conventional gasoline, oxygenated gasoline, ultra-low sulfur diesel, biodiesel, and jet fuel. The facility is ISO 9001:2008 certified.

The facility was originally built in Burnaby as a fuel products terminal in 1920. In 1957, the facility was expanded into a fully integrated refinery. The expansion included installation of refinery operating units in the Port Moody municipality. The facility was converted back to a product distribution terminal in 1993.

The terminal currently operates as one integrated facility, but has areas of operation referred to as upper, middle and lower plants. The majority of petroleum products arrive at the facility via pipeline from Edmonton and are intended for domestic use. A considerable amount of finished products are also received by marine imports to meet Western demand for transportation fuels. Product is then distributed into Western markets via truck, rail and barge.

In 2010, the Burrard Product Terminal received an Eco-freight grant for helping to reduce Green House Gas emissions through the innovative use of a low-sulphur light railcar mover to transport product in and out of the facility.

Key facts:

  • 377 acres in Port Moody and 60 acres in Burnaby (of this 175 acres are being used)
  • The Suncor Burrard Products Terminal has 65 employees and 20-30 core contractors